2020 Highest Paying Jobs, Best Companies and Fastest Growing Industries to Change Jobs

Change your job with Career Coaching 360

 

Want to change jobs in 2020? Now is a great time for a career change with currently 7.3 million job openings in the US, and an incredible 1.4 million more job openings than unemployed job seekers as reported in the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (known as JOLTS.)  In fact, the unemployment rate remains at a 50-year low hovering at 3.5%.

As a leadership coach inside a Fortune 100 company for the past 3 years, as well as having my own private practice as a career coach for the past 10 years, I have been writing about Bouncing Back After a Layoff and helping professionals pivot, re-brand and advance their career. Every year, I provide my clients an environmental blueprint of the job market to help them change jobs faster and easier.  Below is a list of references and insights for the highest paying jobs, best companies and fastest growing industries in 2020.

What are the highest paying jobs of 2020?

Investopedia’s 25 highest paid occupations in the US for 2019 shows that healthcare dominates the salary ladder (anesthesiologists claim the top spot at an average $267k annual salary), and corporate chief executives are the next highest paid profession with an average $200k annual salary.

Glassdoor recently published this report, 10 high paying jobs with tons of open positions.

If you’d like some job security along with high pay, the LinkedIn 2020 Emerging Jobs report shows there is substantial job growth and hiring in job roles for artificial intelligence, robotics engineering, data science and engineering, customer service, behavioral health, and cybersecurity.

US News published 100 Best Jobs based on jobs with high pay, plus strong job growth and challenge, manageable stress and work/life balance.  The three top spots go to software developer, statistician and physician’s assistant.

One of the hottest career trends right now is having a side hustle. Bankrate’s survey of 2,550 adults reveals 45-percent of American workers have a gig outside their primary job, and 27-percent are more passionate about their side gig than their primary job.  Check out Business Insider’s 7 best side hustles to earn 6-figures or more in 2020. CNBC published highest paying freelance jobs of 2020 where you earn $90k or more, and Money.com featured the 20 highest paying job skills for freelancers.

Looking for less stress in your life?  Business Insider identified high paying jobs for people who don’t like stress and includes environmental scientists, astronomers, mathematicians and various college professor positions.  Business News Daily published Top 10 most and least stressful jobs.

If geography is a primary factor in your job, then check out the highest paid job in every state in 2019 by MarketWatch, and ZipRecruiter’s 10 hottest job markets in 2020.

Indeed identified a terrific list of heroic civilian jobs in high demand such as environmental engineers, social workers, firefighters, nurses and others who serve the public.

What some fun in you work?  How about being a Lego master builder, brew master or toy creator featured on  cool jobs that pay well by Moneywise.  Also check out 10 fascinating jobs you never knew existed by RD.com such as Walt Disney imagineer, B-B-Q restaurant tour guide and sea urchin diver.

2-year degree jobs with salaries as high as $80k are listed in in this study by US News & World Report, “10 community college degree jobs that pay $50k or more.”  The best jobs for trade school graduates published by thebalancecareers.com and US News highest paying jobs without a degree are great resources.

Since we’re on the topic of high paying jobs, if you want a high pay and not sure whether to invest in getting a college (or advanced) degree, you may want to read “Education and Lifetime Earnings in the United States” by Christopher R. Tamborini, ChangHwan Kim, and Arthur Sakamoto. This study reveals that men with graduate degrees earn approximately $1.5 million more in median lifetime earnings than high school graduates (women earn $1.1 million more.)   Men with bachelor’s degrees earn approximately $900,000 more in lifetime earnings than high school graduates (women with bachelor’s degrees earn on average $630,000 more.)

What are the best companies to work for in 2020?

Is money the only driving factor in changing your job?  I teach my clients that making a higher salary may be a priority, but what about the environment where you work?  What kind of company culture and values are important to you?

Glassdoor conducts loads of research and published best places to work in 2020 based on the quality, quantity and consistency of employee reviews. This is a great way to get a sneak peek inside companies that are interested in you and learn about their culture, management style and work/life balance.  Fortune’s 100 best companies to work for is based on employee reviews, company perks and opportunities for innovation.

If you love innovation and enjoy solving problems, designing products or launching new technologies, then check out Forbes’ list of the world’s most innovative companiesForbes lists also include America’s best employers for diversity, the fintech 50 and the world’s top regarded companies.

If you want more meaningful work Fortune’s list “change the world” spotlights 52 companies across the globe that are doing well by doing good things for the planet and society.  Indeed’s top rated workplaces for veterans spotlights Keller Williams Realty, the FBI and Northrop Grumman based on more than 200-million ratings on Indeed.

If you’re craving more freedom and flex time in your schedule, you may want to work for one of the Top 40 companies to watch for flexible jobs in 2020 by FlexJobs based on the analysis of more than 52,000 companies.

Also, here is a cheat sheet of companies that are hiring, or most likely to be hiring 100 Fastest Growing Companies by Fortune and based on 3 years of performance with regards to revenue, profits and stock returns.

What are the fastest growing industries?

PayScale’s “Economic trends: reflections on 2019, predictions for 2020” report reveals that finance, healthcare, energy, retail, construction and real estate will be high growth industries in 2020.

When you change jobs, keep in mind that just because you have a job in a specific niche doesn’t mean that you must work in that specific industry.  In other words, if you work in IT, it doesn’t mean that you have to work in the IT industry. There are all kinds of industries and companies that need experts in IT, finance, sales, HR, marketing, communications, PR, customer support, legal, administrative, business operations, management, leadership and other fields. In fact, I’ve successfully upleveled my own career four times by switching industries.

Finally, another tip I share with my clients who want to change jobs is if you’re looking to make an immediate career change, then go for jobs that have less competition. How can you know which industries have the smallest pool of job applicants?  One of the references I use is this nifty little cheat sheet published by Indeed, “Industries where it’s tougher to find talent” which reveals that education, health services, financial and manufacturing industries have a lot of blue ocean and tough time finding qualified job candidates. CNBC took it a step further to add pay information in their article, industries with the highest share of job openings and how much they pay.

I hope these resources help you land a new job where you feel fully empowered and appreciated.


Sherri Thomas is a leadership coach inside a Fortune 100 company, as well as Founder/President of Career Coaching 360.  She has helped more than 1,000 executives and professionals pivot, re-brand and advance their career. As a leader helping organizations build diversity and talent management programs, Sherri has spoken at conferences and events across the world including the United States, Singapore, Malaysia, Bali, Haiti, Israel, Canada, Mexico, Vietnam, Ireland and Kenya. Her award-winning book, “The Bounce Back – personal stories of bouncing back higher and faster after a layoff, re-org or career setback“ was named 2013 Best Career Book by the Indie Book Awards. Her first book, “Career Smart – 5 Steps to a powerful personal brand“ was previously #3 on AMAZON’s TOP 10 LIST for personal branding books. Download “15 Clever Ways to Get More Job Offers” free video training at CareerCoaching360.com

Stop Going With the Flow in Your Career

buy paper onlinep>  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One year from now, do you want to be doing the exact same kind of work you're doing today?

If not, then there are a few things you need to START doing, and a few things to STOP doing…

  1. Stop going with the flow.

    Stop working on mundane projects you can do in your sleep. Part of the reason you’re feeling under-utilized and under-valued is because you’re under-challenged. We weren’t meant to take a job and then stay there forever. We’re meant to stretch, develop, grow, bounce. Look for ways to step up and flex your professional muscles. When you stop learning and growing, your career will stall.

  2. Stop taking setbacks personally.

    Everyone experiences career setbacks. Everyone! If you’ve been a victim of a layoff, a demotion, a project that failed or didn’t get accepted then get over it! Hanging on to feelings of rejection, embarrassment or anger isn’t helping you. You only think other people care about your setback, but seriously, they’ve moved on and you need to, too. It’s not the setback itself that is holding you back, but how you’re internalizing it.

  3. Stop being “small.”

    If you think that being humble and shy will help you be successful, think again. When somebody offers you a big juicy project or a spot on a high profile team – grab it! Saying things like, “Oh, I don’t know if I’d be the best choice for that,” or, “I don’t know if I have the right experience to do that” will keep you sitting on the bench. You’ve got to step up, be bold and put yourself out there (especially if the new opportunity scares you!) Yes, finding new opportunities means taking risks – big bold risks that you won’t be able to take if you’re playing it small.

And here are a few things you'll need to start doing…

  1.  Start talking about what you want to do.

    Start describing the types of responsibilities and the kinds of projects and teams you want to work on. If you don’t have a crystal clear vision, then at least start talking about the type of work you enjoy doing. By simply having these conversations with your manager, colleagues, and those in your network can lead to new career paths and opportunities.

  2. Start claiming your space.

    Put your expertise out there by showing others you have something to say through presentations, articles, coaching others and speaking up in meetings. Don’t be a shrinking violet, but instead, have confidence, be bold and voice your technical opinion. So what if someone may not agree with you – that just makes it a more interesting conversation. Successful executives and professionals constantly put themselves “out there” – that’s why they’re successful. Don’t shy away or back up, but instead step up, speak out and claim your space at the table.

  3. Start charting your course.

    Go find people working in different industries and job roles. Ask them about their responsibilities, education, training, challenges and career paths. Get connected to those who inspire you. Give yourself permission and time to explore all possibilities. That doesn’t mean that you have to accept every opportunity that comes your way, but you at least owe it to yourself to learn what else is out there so that you can get ready for your next career move.

Successful professionals aren't successful because they let things “happen.”  Instead, they make things happen in their career.  They figure out what they want, take some risks, stretch, grow, fall down, learn and bounce.  Don't let someone else take the wheel on your career path.  Step up and make things happen.  It's your career and your year! 🙂

————————————————————————————-

Sherri Thomas is a Career Strategist, international speaker and best-selling author of two books including “Career Smart – 5 Steps to a Powerful Personal Brand” which is currently on AMAZON's TOP 10 LISTfor personal branding books, and “The Bounce Back – personal stories of bouncing back higher and faster from a layoff, re-org or career setback” also available on AMAZON and BARNES & NOBLE.   Right now you can download three FREE CHAPTERS of “The Bounce Back” at http://www.MyBounceBack.com

765qwerty765

Career Sampling – 5 Ways to Test Drive a New Career

Old School NASCAR- Richard Petty 1992

Image by James Marvin Phelps via Flickr

Everyone has bad days at work, but if your bad day stretches to a hundred bad days(!) then you may want to start thinking about reinventing your career.   

Twice during my own career I found myself in a frustrating and unchallenging job and stayed longer than I should have.   Mostly because I was delusional and thought that if I proved my loyalty and stayed with the company long enough they’d reward me with a “new and improved” job, (did I mention the delusional part?), but also because I was afraid of trying something new, and potentially failing.  

If you’re in a similar situation and the thought of charting into unknown career territory makes you want to curl up under your office cube, then you may want to try what I’m calling ”career sampling” – the art of dipping your toe into a pool of new career opportunities, before diving in head first.

Career sampling is a great way to test drive a new career without investing a lot of time, or risking your paycheck.  Here are five great strategies to help you determine if a new career is right for you… 

  1. Take on an extended assignment. 
    Look across all the departments within your current organization to see if there are any projects or teams that interest you.    Many times managers and project leaders jump at the chance to have someone join their team – even if that person doesn’t have any experience.  This is a great way to test the waters of a new career. 

    Also, are there any external initiatives that inspire you?  Many companies have community programs and special events that you may be able to support.  Finally, talk to your manager, peers and other department managers to see which professional and civic organizations they’re involved in.  Take advantage of opportunities that could help you learn about new industries or job roles.
     

  2. Try freelancing or consulting.  If you’re thinking about owning your own business, try setting up shop first as a freelancer or consultant.  You’ll be able to set your own hours, develop your business plan and gain some experience before investing all of your time, money and energy full time.  It’s also a great way to earn some extra cash! 
     
  3. Work part-time.  A great way to test drive a new job role, company or industry is to start out part time.  Investing a little time up front to take on a part-time position is a much better strategy than investing all your time and realizing you’ve made a bad career choice.If you think you don’t have the right experience, a great attitude and eagerness to learn can help get your foot in the door.   And once you start proving yourself and showing results, a promotion to a full time position could be just around the corner!
     
  4. Volunteer your time. This is the quickest way to gain insight and experience into a new career. As your Career Coach, I encourage you to research company websites, read trade magazines, and attend industry conferencs and business networking events to learn about volunteer opportunities.  Volunteer your time and talents, and in return, learn all you can about that industry, different job roles, and the skills and qualifications of others who have been successful in those job roles that interest you.
     
  5. Join a Professional Organization.  Most cities have organizations such as the American Marketing Association, American Medical Association, Small Business Association, American Society for Engineering Education, etc. which provide excellent education, training and networking opportunities.Consider attending meetings, becoming a member, or stepping up to join their Board of Directors.  Take advantage of every opportunity to learn about various industries and career opportunities.  

If you’re itching to change your career for something more meaningful or inspiring, then try career sampling.  It’s less risky, less stressful, and a smarter way to transition into a career that’s right for you!

 And finally…If you’re ready to make a career change, get some professional help. You’ll have an easier, quicker, less stressful journey ahead of you when you have a partner who can give you the roadmap on how to reach your goal.

Here’s to your success! 🙂

Enhanced by Zemanta

REINVENTING YOURSELF: How to change job roles, industries or professional goals…

Our Direction
Image by B Tal via Flickr

Craving a new career?  Tired of being under-valued, under-appreciated and unmotivated?  If so, then maybe you need to take a new direction and reinvent your career.

Reinventing your career successfully simply means repackaging your skills, qualifications and accomplishments so that you can transition into a new job role, company, or industry. Below is my personal career coaching 5-step blueprint for reinventing your career more quickly, easily and maybe even with a higher salary!
In which industry would you like to work? Advertising? Finance? Health Care? When I wanted to stop being a disc jockey, I knew that I wanted to go into television. And after a successful career in television, I then set my sights on getting into Corporate America. I wasn’t sure what kind of job role I wanted (or could get!), but the first step was determining the industry where I wanted to work.

  1. Define your passion –  If you’re not sure where you want to go then read trade magazines, industry publications and on-line job postings. Visit a bookstore and browse through books and magazines to see what grabs your attention. Allow yourself time to figure out what lights your fire and inspires you!

     2.  Identify your transferable skills –  These are skills that transition from industry to industry, or from job role to job role. Examples include: managing projects, teams, clients or budgets, as well as negotiating contracts, or proposing and implementing ideas that generate money, save money, or help the company be more competitive.

Other transferable skills include personal characteristics such as demonstrating leadership or risk taking, training or mentoring team members, being goal driven, results oriented, a problem solver, or having the ability to influence senior managers. These are ALL great skills to have, and they transfer from industry to industry. All industries and companies value employees with these types of skills and characteristics.

     3. Match your transferable skills to job roles –  Read job descriptions posted on CareerJournal.com, CareerBuilder.com and Monster.com, as well as the classified ads in industry magazines, trade journals, and local newspapers. If you want to work for a specific company then check out their website’s on-line job postings. Learn the skills and qualifications required for various job roles.

Match your transferable skills to those jobs you want to go after. If there’s a gap between the job requirements and the skills you have, then look for ways to gain that experience such as taking on an extended assignment in your current job, freelancing, consulting, or even volunteering.

Also, attend industry conferences, trade shows, business networking events and association meetings. Talk to people who work in the industry to learn about their career path, responsibilities, and advice for how to break into the business.

     4.  Blow up your resume.  The first thing I always did before I transitioned into a new career was blow up my resume. Trying to piece together a resume that highlighted the skills I used to get my last job with the skills I need to land my next job is like trying to weld together Lexus parts on a BMW. It doesn’t work. You need a brand new resume.

Showcase only those jobs, responsibilities and successes that are relevant to the job you want. The hiring manager doesn’t care about every job you’ve ever had. They just want to know, Can you do their job? Get resume help now.

     5.  Attitude is king!  Remember, great jobs don’t just land in your lap. You have to know what you want – take action – and go after it! Your job is out there. You just need to go get it!

When you transition into a new job role or a new company, you need to show the hiring manager that you have confidence in yourself and know that you’ll be successful in the job. When it comes to reinventing your career, it’s not just your talent but your attitude that counts!

 And finally…If you’re ready to make a career change, get some professional help. You’ll have an easier, quicker, less stressful journey ahead of you when you have a partner who can give you the roadmap on how to reach your goal.

Here’s to your success!  🙂

Enhanced by Zemanta

PARADE Update: You Got The Interview! Now What?

PARADE Update: You Got The Interview! Now What?


One hour after Meghan sent her hot-off-the-press professionally updated resume to a hiring manager, he called to see if she could come in for an interview the next day!

Interviewing is intimidating, nerve wracking, and can make you feel like you’re two beats away from a heart attack. But preparing for the interview is much simpler when you realize that there are just five key questions going through your interviewer’s mind.

Here are three of them:

Can you do the job? You need to be able to talk about the skills, knowledge, and training you have that will help you perform the job successfully. My recommendation is that you walk into your next interview with 3-4 “personal career stories” that showcase a career success. Your stories should include: what the goal was, what the challenge was, and what the result was.

What “extras” do you bring? For most job openings, about 90% of the work has been defined but not the remaining 10%. This means you have a terrific opportunity to flaunt any bonus talents that may be of value. For example, if you’re going for a job as a Pubic Relations manager, you may have some experience in marketing or desktop publishing that is not required for the job, but might be valuable to the company.

Where are you a risk? Every new employee is a risk to a company, whether it’s a job requirement that you don’t meet or a skill you don’t have, or the potential that you’re overqualified for the position. I recommend that you beat the interviewer to the punch by stating where you a risk and then reassuring him why it won’t be a problem. If you’re asked what weaknesses you have, respond by bringing up an area that could improvement but quickly add what you are already doing to strengthen that area.

For a complete discussion of all five question, see my best-selling eBook, “Interviewing Smart: Insider Secrets to Getting the Job

PARADE Update: Creating a Rock Star Resume

PARADE Update: Creating a Rock Star Resume


Meghan found a terrific job opening at a socially conscience company where she can leverage her marketing expertise and culinary background.

As I talked about in my book, “Career Smart – 5 Steps to a Powerful Personal Brand,” this is what I know for sure: When you are able to articulate the kinds of responsibilities, the management style and company culture where you want to work in your next career – the universe has a way of sending you those opportunities.

And now the universe is churning out opportunities for Meghan! The next step is for us to create a rock star resume.

Here are my top three tips for creating a resume to help you get noticed, get hired and even get a higher salary!

Showcase key words. Key words are those skills in the job postings that are listed as the “job requirements.” Look closely at the job description and use a highlighter to mark all of the requirements listed. Then, take all of those requirements that you meet and showcase those “key words” towards the top of your resume underneath the “Objective” section. Label this section “Key Strengths” and list those requirements that you meet in bullet format.

Emphasize results. This is the single biggest difference in making your resume stand out from your competition. Don’t talk about responsibilities. That’s boring. Instead, talk about what you have achieved for an organization, or what you’ve helped the organization achieve. For example, don’t just say that you managed a team of 9 people in the sales department. Instead, say that you led a sales team that generated $250,000 a year for the past three years. Quantify each of your career highlights in terms of dollars, numbers or percentages.

Show leadership and teamwork. Hiring managers look for candidates who are strong contributors and strong leaders (or at least demonstrate leadership potential.) Talk about projects or teams that you’ve led – and what the results were. If you haven’t led any projects or teams in your professional life, then highlight any leadership experience you’ve had in professional organizations, sports leagues, church activities or community events.

Meghan’s Assignment this Week:
I gave Meghan one of my exclusive resume templates to showcase her marketing and events-management skills. She will be busy this week converting her resume from being “responsibilities” to “results” focused. That means she’ll be meeting with past managers and business associates to learn the real results of her previous marketing campaigns and big projects. Ideally, she’ll want her resume to state that her marketing campaigns helped gain a certain number of new customers, or that the projects she worked on helped generate new revenue, saved the company money, or created more market share for the organization.
Her homework assignment is not easy, but it will be the icing on the cake to help Meghan’s resume stand out from her competition and land that fabulous job.

Career Reinvention: 5-Step Action Plan for Changing Job Roles, Industries or Professional Goals

Prefer to listen to the podcast version of this post? Subscribe to our Career Coaching 360 podcast RSS feed. Career Coaching 360 podcasts are also available on iTunes.

There are times in everyone’s career that you feel like running away and starting all over again, and I’m here to say that you can do it!

I’ve successfully reinvented my own career four times including being in radio, television, professional sports, high tech, and now a successful entrepreneur and business owner.

Now one of the things I get asked most often is, “Can I reinvent my career without taking a step down in salary?” Every time I’ve reinvented my career, I’ve received between 20 to 45% increase in my salary. So you can move into a NEW career AND INCREASE your salary.

So let me share with you my five step action plan for reinventing your career AND getting a salary increase…

    1. Find your passion. What gets you excited? What gets you jazzed? The first step in reinventing your career is to identifying where you want to go. In which industry would you like to work? Advertising? Finance? Health Care? When I wanted to stop being a disc jockey, I knew that I wanted to go into television. And after a successful career in television, I then set my sights on getting into Corporate America. I wasn’t sure what kind of job role I wanted (or could get!), but the first step was determining the industry where I wanted to work.

      If you’re not sure where you want to go then start reading trade magazines, industry publications, on-line job sites, even classified ads in your local newspaper. The key is to figure out what lights your fire and inspires you.

 

    1. Identify your transferable skills. These are skills that transition from industry to industry or from job role to job role. Examples include: managing projects, teams, clients or budgets, as well as negotiating contracts, or proposing and implementing ideas that generate money, save money, or help the company be more competitive.

      Other transferable skills include personal characteristics such as demonstrating leadership or risk taking, training or mentoring team members, being goal driven, results oriented, a problem solver, or having the ability to influence senior managers. These are great skills to have, and they transfer from industry to industry. All kinds of industries and companies value employees with these types of skills and characteristics.

 

    1. Matching your transferable skills to job roles. Read job descriptions posted on CareerJournal.com, CareerBuilder.com and Monster.com, as well as the classified ads in industry magazines, trade journals, and local newspapers. If you want to work for a specific company then check out their website’s on-line job postings. Learn the skills and qualifications required for various job roles.

      Match your transferable skills to those jobs you want to go after. If there’s a gap between the required skills and the skills that you currently have, then look for ways to gain that experience such as taking on an extended assignment in your current job, freelancing, consulting, or even volunteering.

      Also, attend industry conferences, trade shows, business networking events and association meetings. Talk to people who work in the industry to learn about their career path, responsibilities, and advice for how to break into the business.

 

    1. Blow up your resume. The first thing I always did before I transitioned into a new career was blow up my resume. Trying to piece together a resume that highlighted the skills I used to get my last job with the skills I need to land my next job is like trying to weld together Lexus parts on a BMW. It doesn’t work. You need a brand new resume.

      Showcase only those jobs, responsibilities and successes that relate to the job you want. The hiring manager doesn’t care about every job you’ve ever had. They just want to know if you can do their job. You may also want to get a professional resume critique to help you customize your resume and identify your transferable skills.

 

  1. Attitude is the key ingredient! I’ve found that getting a new job really boils down to two things: confidence and passion. I’ve never walked into an interview having met all of the job requirements. In fact, for the television interview, I lacked the two biggest requirements which were a minimum of two years experience in television, and a tape to show my TV work.

    To compensate, I focused on my transferable skills which were being highly creative and a solid copywriter. That got my foot in the door for the interview. But to get the job offer and beat out the other 4 job candidates, I was passionate about the company and the job! I also told the hiring manager that I absolutely knew that I could do the job!

There’s a kind of quiet confidence that we all have down deep inside. A confidence that comes from knowing what we’re capable of doing. When you transition into a new job role or a new company, you need to show the hiring manager that you have confidence in yourself and know that you’ll be successful in the job. When it comes to reinventing your career, it’s not just your talent but your attitude that counts!

Interview Tips for Recent Grads

If you’re a recent college graduate (or even if you’re not), check out my most recent interview on NBC Phoenix Channel 12 with tips to set yourself apart from the other applicants and help you land that first job – even if you don’t have “experience”.

Double your Career Opportunities by Thinking Up, Down and Sideways!

Many people get hung-up on job titles when job hunting. Instead of focusing on the title of the job, focus on the responsibilities. Here are a few quick tips to help point you in the right direction.

  • View jobs with smaller titles when considering a LARGER company.
  • View jobs with bigger titles when considering a SMALLER company.
  • Expand your career options by considering different industries.

New Year, New Career!

NOW is the time to take charge of your career! What career goals do you want to accomplish this year? Do you want to change companies, change job roles within your current company, ask for a raise or land that promotion? Maybe you are just looking to expand your sphere of influence. Figuring out WHAT you want to accomplish is the first step in making it happen!

 

What are some of your career goals for 2010?